Complex Systems
Current Issue

Volume 30, Number 4 (2021)


Extending Proximity Measures to Attributed Networks for Community Detection Download PDF
Rinat Aynulin and Pavel Chebotarev

Proximity measures on graphs are extensively used for solving various problems in network analysis, including community detection. Previous studies have considered proximity measures mainly for networks without attributes. However, attribute information, node attributes in particular, allows a more in-depth exploration of the network structure. This paper extends the definition of a number of proximity measures to the case of attributed networks. To take node attributes into account, attribute similarity is embedded into the adjacency matrix. Obtained attribute-aware proximity measures are numerically studied in the context of community detection in real-world networks.

Keywords: attributed networks; community detection; proximity measure; kernel on graph

Cite this publication as:
R. Aynulin and P. Chebotarev, "Extending Proximity Measures to Attributed Networks for Community Detection," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 441–455.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.441


Transfer Learning for Node Regression Applied to Spreading Prediction Download PDF
Sebastian Mežnar, Nada Lavrač and Blaž Škrlj

Understanding how information propagates in real-life complex networks yields a better understanding of dynamic processes such as misinformation or epidemic spreading. The recently introduced branch of machine learning methods for learning node representations offers many novel applications, one of them being the task of spreading prediction addressed in this paper. We explore the utility of the state-of-the-art node representation learners when used to assess the effects of spreading from a given node, estimated via extensive simulations. Further, as many real-life networks are topologically similar, we systematically investigate whether the learned models generalize to previously unseen networks, showing that in some cases very good model transfer can be obtained. This paper is one of the first to explore transferability of the learned representations for the task of node regression; we show there exist pairs of networks with similar structure between which the trained models can be transferred (zero-shot) and demonstrate their competitive performance. To our knowledge, this is one of the first attempts to evaluate the utility of zero-shot transfer for the task of node regression.

Keywords: epidemics; neural networks; machine learning; spreading; transfer learning  

Cite this publication as:
S. Mežnar, N. Lavrač and B. Škrlj, "Transfer Learning for Node Regression Applied to Spreading Prediction," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 457–481.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.457


A Self-Modeling Network Model Addressing Controlled Adaptive Mental Models for Analysis and Support Processes Download PDF
Jan Treur

In this paper, a self-modeling mental network model is presented for cognitive analysis and support processes for a human. These cognitive analysis and support processes are modeled by internal mental models. At the base level, the model is able to perform the analysis and support processes based on these internal mental models. To obtain adaptation of these internal mental models, a first-order self-model is included in the network model. In addition, to obtain control of this adaptation, a second-order self-model is included. This makes the network model a second-order self-modeling network model. The adaptive network model is illustrated for a number of realistic scenarios for a supported car driver.

Cite this publication as:
J. Treur, "A Self-Modeling Network Model Addressing Controlled Adaptive Mental Models for Analysis and Support Processes," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 483–512.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.483


Impact of Nonlocal Interaction on Chimera States in Nonlocally Coupled Stuart–Landau Oscillators Download PDF
K. Premalatha, R. Amuda, V. K. Chandrasekar, M. Senthilvelan and M. Lakshmanan

We investigate the existence of collective dynamical states in nonlocally coupled Stuart–Landau oscillators with symmetry breaking included in the coupling term. We find that the radius of nonlocal interaction and nonisochronicity parameter play important roles in identifying the swing of synchronized states through amplitude chimera states. Collective dynamical states are distinguished with the help of strength of incoherence. Different transition routes to multi-chimera death states are analyzed with respect to the nonlocal coupling radius. In addition, we investigate the existence of collective dynamical states including traveling wave state, amplitude chimera state and multi-chimera death state by introducing higher-order nonlinear terms in the system. We also verify the robustness of the given notable properties for the coupled system.

Keywords: Stuart–Landau oscillators, nonlocal coupling, chimera states

Cite this publication as:
K. Premalatha, R. Amuda, V. K. Chandrasekar, M. Senthilvelan and M. Lakshmanan, "Impact of Nonlocal Interaction on Chimera States in Nonlocally Coupled Stuart–Landau Oscillators," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 513–524.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.513


The Impact of Edge Correlations in Random Networks Download PDF
András Faragó

Random graphs are frequently used models of real-life random networks. The classical Erdös–Rényi random graph model is very well explored and has numerous nontrivial properties. In particular, a good number of important graph parameters that are hard to compute in the deterministic case often become much easier in random graphs. However, a fundamental restriction in the Erdös–Rényi random graph is that the edges are required to be probabilistically independent. This is a severe restriction, which does not hold in most real-life networks.

We consider more general random graphs in which the edges may be dependent. Specifically, two models are analyzed. The first one is called a p-robust random graph. It is defined by the requirement that each edge exist with probability at least p, no matter how we condition on the presence/absence of other edges. It is significantly more general than assuming independent edges existing with probability p, as exemplified via several special cases. The second model considers the case when the edges are positively correlated, which means that the edge probability is at least p for each edge, no matter how we condition on the presence of other edges (but absence is not considered). We prove some interesting, nontrivial properties about both models.

Keywords: random graph; dependent edges; monotone graph property; edge correlation; geometric random graph  

Cite this publication as:
A. Faragó, "The Impact of Edge Correlations in Random Networks," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 525–537.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.525


Comparing Methods for Measuring Walkability Download PDF
Aaron Bramson, Kazuto Okamoto and Megumi Hori

Walkability analyses have gained increased attention for economic, environmental and health reasons, but the methods for assessing walkability have yet to be broadly evaluated. In this paper, five methods for calculating walkability scores are described: in-radius, circle buffers, road network node buffers, road network edge buffers and a fully integrated network approach. Unweighted and various weighted versions are analyzed to capture levels of preference for walking longer distances. The methods are evaluated via an application to train stations in central Tokyo in terms of accuracy, similarity and algorithm performance. The fully integrated network method produces the most accurate results in the shortest amount of processing time, but requires a large upfront investment of time and resources. The circle buffer method runs a bit slower, but does not require any network information and when properly weighted yields walkability scores very similar to the integrated network approach.

Keywords: walkability, accessibility, transportation networks, geospatial analysis

Cite this publication as:
A. Bramson, K. Okamoto and M. Hori, "Comparing Methods for Measuring Walkability," Complex Systems, 30(4), 2021 pp. 539–565.
https://doi.org/10.25088/ComplexSystems.30.4.539

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